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Graduate Peers' Schedules

Winter 2016
Peer Advisor Availability

Writing Peer
Kyle Crocco

Mon: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Tue: 10 a.m.-noon
Wed: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Thu: 10 a.m.-noon

Funding Peer
Stephanie Griffin
Mon: 10 a.m.-noon
Wed: noon-2 p.m.

Diversity Peer
Ana Romero

Mon: noon-2 p.m.
Wed: 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

The peers sometimes hold events or attend meetings during their regular office hours. To assure you connect with your Graduate Peer Advisor, we encourage you to contact them by email and make an appointment.

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Entries in impact (1)

Thursday
Jan072016

Getting Your Research Beyond the Ivory Tower

Credit: Naturejobs.comSo you've written your academic article (yay!), you've gone through the sometimes-grueling peer review process (thank God it's over!), and now your journal of choice is ready to publish your brilliant research (finally!). Now what?

The process of getting your research out and increasing its impact is not yet over, but the next part of the process is a lot more fun than copy-editing and reading Reviewer #2's comments. In a recent article on Naturejobs, Jack Leeming shares his tips on how to get your paper noticed.

  1. Write a clear paper. Keep your prose as light and jargon free as possible, whilst still maintaining the level of accuracy you need for a research paper.
  2. Write a lay summary and post it somewhere. Write a short summary (400-600 words), have a non-specialist read it for clarity, and then post it online in the appropriate venues (such as your department website/blog or your professional portfolio).
  3. Tell your press office about it. They can help prepare a press release based on your (hopefully) clearly written paper and your accessible lay summary close to your publication date.
  4. Prepare your social media circle. Before your paper comes out, engage with journalists, editors, and scholars via social media to help establish yourself as a contributor to conversations.
  5. Use The Conversation and sidestep all of the above. The Conversation is a news site with content coming entirely from academic researchers. An editor will help you craft a piece into something suitable for mainstream media, and then your article will be freely available for any other organization to publish.

To read Leeming's full article, click here.

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