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Graduate Peers' Schedules

Winter 2016
Peer Advisor Availability

Writing Peer
Kyle Crocco

Mon: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Tue: 10 a.m.-noon
Wed: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Thu: 10 a.m.-noon

Funding Peer
Stephanie Griffin
Mon: 10 a.m.-noon
Wed: noon-2 p.m.

Diversity Peer
Ana Romero

Mon: noon-2 p.m.
Wed: 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

The peers sometimes hold events or attend meetings during their regular office hours. To assure you connect with your Graduate Peer Advisor, we encourage you to contact them by email and make an appointment.

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Entries in grad school (2)

Monday
Feb082016

Optimizing Motivation and Well Being Workshop Recap

Motivation word chart

"Why am I in grad school!?"

If you have ever asked yourself that question, you are not alone. Dr. Jennifer LaGuardia from Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) has some helpful information about how we can find ways to "reboot our motivation" and optimize our well being. 

Here are some things to consider

  • What got you interested in graduate school? and What keeps you going? Reflecting on these questions will help you identify what is driving your motivation. 
  • According to Self-Determination Therapy (SDI), motivation is a psychological energy that is directed towards a goal. It is not the quantity, but the quality of motivation that is important because it influences persistance and well-being. Quality of motivation is determined by one's experience of autonomy, competence, and relatedness. 

What can you do?

Begin by reflecting on the ways your own psychological needs are being met or not, make an action plan, and enlist social support. "CARES" Self-Assessment is one way of doing this:

  • Competence: What are the areas you feel most confident about in your work? 
  • Autonomy: Are you able to pursue your interests and valued goals?  
  • Relatedness: How connected do you feel with others in your department? 
  • Extrinsic Compensation & Equity: Are you given enough resources and training to do your work? Are they enough to support your work? 
  • Structure: Are you given clear expectations and details about how to achieve your goals (graduate degree, research, etc.)? 
Tuesday
Jan202015

Coping with Stress in Grad School

Are you troubled by strange noises in the middle of the night?

Do you experience feelings of dread in your basement or attic?

Have you or any member of your family ever seen a spook, specter, or ghost?

You may remember Dan Akroyd, Ivan Reitman, and Bill Murray posing these questions during their advertisement in Ghostbusters. The same list applies when mulling over life in graduate school! Waking at all hours, feelings of dread, and wild imagination may become commonplace as you pursue your degree. Nailing down the specific sources of stress - while not always easy to do - proves helpful.

Jason McSheene, a Ph.D. student in molecular biology at Princeton, has decided to give identifying these stressors a shot in his recent post to Gradhacker at InsideHigherEd. McSheene identifies four central areas of stress: no clear boundaries of graduate school responsibilities; frequent, unwarranted, or invalid comparisons to others; living the 'Lone Wolf' life; and the perception that grad school will never end. Each of these stressors comes with some suggestions, which could be a good starting point for anyone looking to identify the feelings of dread following them around campus.