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Graduate Peers' Schedules

Winter 2016
Peer Advisor Availability

Writing Peer
Kyle Crocco

Mon: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Tue: 10 a.m.-noon
Wed: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Thu: 10 a.m.-noon

Funding Peer
Stephanie Griffin
Mon: 10 a.m.-noon
Wed: noon-2 p.m.

Diversity Peer
Ana Romero

Mon: noon-2 p.m.
Wed: 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

The peers sometimes hold events or attend meetings during their regular office hours. To assure you connect with your Graduate Peer Advisor, we encourage you to contact them by email and make an appointment.

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Entries in funding (4)

Thursday
Oct292015

Easy and Free Tools to Help Students Budget

In addition to the pressures of academic requirements, job searches, and personal relationships, many students also feel financial stress; we have more money leaving our bank accounts than going into them.

Credit: Pinterest.com

Tracking expenses is the first step toward budgeting and financial planning. It’s important to know exactly where you’re spending your elusive money, and the results may surprise you. Getting an occasional coffee at Courtyard Café or a late-night pizza can certainly add up. Luckily, there are several easy and free ways to help monitor expenses:

  • Keeping a spending journal. Write down everything you spend for a month (or longer), and you’ll have a good idea of where your money is going. After that, you’ll be able to identify easy areas to save money (e.g., making coffee at home and bringing it to school, rather than a handful of visits to the coffee shop).
  • Mint.com. Sign up for a free account, and not only can you track your spending, but Mint will also suggest personalized savings tips. Other fun features include bill pay and free credit score checks.
  • LevelMoney. This app connects to your bank accounts and allows you more input into your saving and spending goals. After entering these goals, the app will track your purchases and tell you how much you have left to spend for a given period to stay on course.
  • PearBudget. Based off a simple Excel sheet, this website allows you to register for free with customized spending categories. You can export the Excel sheet for free, but after the first month trial period, an account with PearBudget costs $5 a month.
  • Free monthly spending trackers and credit reports from your credit card company. More credit card companies are helping their customers track their spending with spending analyzers in their monthly statements (e.g., Discover Card).
Monday
Apr042011

Great Tools from the Office of Research

As you plan your spring quarter and make some headway on upcoming grant and funding opportunities, we wanted to remind you to make use of the Office of Research webpage, which was updated and re-launched back in January. There are some great tools and resources for graduate students that we'd love to remind you of. Here is an excerpt from a previous post telling you all about what you can gain from the Office of Research website (http://www.research.ucsb.edu/ ):

"While the Office's primary responsibility is to assist campus faculty, staff, and researchers to secure funding for their research programs, there are a few items of interest to graduate students:

-The seminars calendar (http://www.research.ucsb.edu/seminars/) includes seminars, lectures, symposia, conferences, colloquia, and other events from UCSB-affiliated researchers and visiting scholars from all disciplines that are open to a campus audience.

-The Graduate Students page (http://www.research.ucsb.edu/students/graduate-students/) offers resources for submitting a grant application, finding funding, and meeting compliance requirements.

-The new Researcher's Toolbox (http://www.research.ucsb.edu/toolbox/) gives a step-by-step look at the proposal submission process, which may be applicable for some graduate student fellowships and research grants.

-Profiles in Research (http://www.research.ucsb.edu/profiles/) features in-depth feature stories on faculty research happening across campus.

Friday
Jan142011

New Office of Research Webpage Offers Tools for Graduate Students!

By Courtney Gosnell - GradDiv Funding Peer

Whitney Winn, from the UCSB Office of Research, just shared with me some great information about what resources and tools their new website holds for graduate students. Here's what she had to say:

 

"The Office of Research recently launched its newly redesigned website.

While the Office's primary responsibility is to assist campus faculty, staff, and researchers to secure funding for their research programs, there are a few items of interest to graduate students:

-The seminars calendar (http://www.research.ucsb.edu/seminars/) includes seminars, lectures, symposia, conferences, colloquia, and other events from UCSB-affiliated researchers and visiting scholars from all disciplines that are open to a campus audience.

-The Graduate Students page

(http://www.research.ucsb.edu/students/graduate-students/) offers resources for submitting a grant application, finding funding, and meeting compliance requirements.

-The new Researcher's Toolbox (http://www.research.ucsb.edu/toolbox/)

gives a step-by-step look at the proposal submission process, which may be applicable for some graduate student fellowships and research grants.

-Profiles in Research (http://www.research.ucsb.edu/profiles/) features in-depth feature stories on faculty research happening across campus "

 

If you have any feedback about the new site, please contact Whitney Winn at funding@research.ucsb.edu.

Friday
Aug272010

Post Doc It! Here's How

Dora Farkas, who posts on the GradShare blog and founded PhDNet, provides these pearls of wisdom regarding post doc fellowships. Eat it up:

I write a biweekly Question and Answer column on an online scientist community called Benchfly.com, and I recently received the following question: "How many fellowships do most people apply for when starting their postdoc?" This is an interesting and relevant question particularly as the tough job market is channeling more PhD’s towards the postdoctoral track. According the NSF and the National Postdoctoral Association, there were 89,000 postdoctoral fellows in the United States in 2008, and the percentage of PhD’s going into postdoctoral positions is increasing*

Some students do not need to apply for postdoctoral fellowships because their PI’s have funding for them. Others are not so fortunate, and they need to go through the bureaucracy and secure their own funding. On the flip side, the process of applying for postdoctoral funding gives students experience in grant writing, which is valued highly in academia. Since there are only limited numbers of agencies that grant postdoctoral fellowships in each field, most students only submit one or two applications.

I know that most PhD’s would rather start a job after graduation than do a postdoc, but my advice is to view your postdoctoral position as a unique career opportunity. Many graduate students are so focused on their dissertations that they do not have time to think about their career paths. While you will probably make half as much money as your friends in industry or tenure-track positions, a postdoctoral fellowship will allow you to:

  • Explore different career options at workshops, seminars, and networking events
  • Gain more marketable job skills
  • Improve your publication record
  • Increase your professional network through conferences and collaborations

So, where do you find postdoctoral opportunities? I listed a few online resources below, but your thesis advisor is probably the best person to talk to. He or she could recommend other groups whose research could compliment your experience, as well as places to apply for postdoctoral fellowships.

For more information and to connect with other postdocs, visit the National Postdoctoral Association at:

If you are looking for a postdoctoral position, you will find listings on the following sites:

Of course, universities job bulletin’s and your field’s professional association are also excellent places to find postdoctoral listings.

To find fellowships:

Fellowships in the Social Sciences and Humanities:

You can find more information about postdocs PhDNet’s latest newsletter at:

*References:

Thanks, Dora! More about her amazingness here:

Dora Farkas is the founder of PhDNet and the author of “The Smart Way To Your PhD: 200 Secrets From 100 Graduates."