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Graduate Peers' Schedules

Winter 2016
Peer Advisor Availability

Writing Peer
Kyle Crocco

Mon: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Tue: 10 a.m.-noon
Wed: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Thu: 10 a.m.-noon

Funding Peer
Stephanie Griffin
Mon: 10 a.m.-noon
Wed: noon-2 p.m.

Diversity Peer
Ana Romero

Mon: noon-2 p.m.
Wed: 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

The peers sometimes hold events or attend meetings during their regular office hours. To assure you connect with your Graduate Peer Advisor, we encourage you to contact them by email and make an appointment.

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View UCSB Graduate Student Resources in a larger map

 Winning logo design by Lennon Grinta

APRIL 6-17, 2015

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Grad Slam 2015 from UCSBGradPost on Vimeo.

 

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Over $13,000 in cash and prizes will be awarded!

GRAND PRIZE - $5,000
RUNNERS UP - $2,500 each (2 prizes total)
SEMI-FINALIST WINNERS - $200 each (10 prizes total)
PRELIMINARY ROUND WINNERS - $50 each (24 prizes total)
 

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Presentation SCHEDULE

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EVENT Sponsors


 

GRAND PRIZE provided by

 

 

 

 

 

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Click HERE to check out resources for presenters 

Click HERE for information about rules and judging 

For more information about Grad Slam, please e-mail Robert Hamm

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Grad Slam is the centerpiece of the UCSB Graduate Student Showcase, a two-week series of events which publicly highlights the enormous achievements and world-changing ideas of UCSB graduate students.  

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PEOPLE'S CHOICE

During each of the preliminary rounds, attendees will have the chance to vote for their favorite presenter via anonymous ballots. The winner of the People’s Choice from each prelim round will advance to a special semi-finals round, where they will compete against other People’s Choice winners for two slots in the final round on Friday, April 17. Note: audience members must be present for all the talks in a given round in order to vote for People's Choice.

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2015 Competition Schedule

Preliminary Round Schedule:

MONDAY, APRIL 6:

ROUND 1 - Multipurpose Room, Student Resource Building - 11 a.m. to noon

  • Aubrie Adams, Communication: “Adaptation in T3xt Communication”
  • Alexa Fredston-Hermann, Bren School of Environmental Science and Management: “A Conceptual Framework for Understanding the Relative Impact of Nitrogen Runoff on Coastal Ecosystems”
  • Umihiko Hoshijima, Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology: “Kelp Forests on Acid: Local Climate Change Mitigation in a Changing Ocean”
  • Erika I-Tremblay, Education: “Literacy in Japanese Higher Education”
  • Hung Phan, Chemistry and Biochemistry: “Charge Transport in High-Mobility Organic Thin-Film Transistors: Jet-skiing or Hopping?”
  • Laura Reynolds, Earth Science: “Memories in Mud: How Marshes Tell Us about Past, Present, and Future Sea-Level Change”

ROUND 2 - 1605 Elings Hall - 3 to 4 p.m.

  • Sarah Abdul-Wajid, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology: “Using Sea Squirts to Find New Genetic Factors Controlling Birth Defects”
  • Joseph Alvarado, Chemistry and Biochemistry: “Total Synthesis of (-) Galanthamine”
  • Aileen Fullchange, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology: “The HEROES Project”
  • Daniel Hieber, Linguistics: “Renaissance on the Bayou: Reviving the Chitimacha Language”
  • Nicole Lesperance, Electrical and Computer Engineering: “Preventing Hardware Trojan Horses”
  • Lisa McAllister, Anthropology: “Who Reaps the Rewards and Who Pays the Costs of Adolescent Reproduction: Insights from the Bolivian Amazon”
  • Micaela Morgan, Education: “Improving STEM Engagement of Students in the 2-Year to 4-Year Higher Education Pipeline”

TUESDAY, APRIL 7:

ROUND 3 - Engineering Science Building 1001 - 11 a.m. to noon 

  • Jamie Booth, Mechanical Engineering: “Gecko-Inspired Adhesive Materials”
  • Casey Garrett, Bren School of Environmental Science and Management: “Water Matters: Evaluating Water-Related Risk in a Pharmaceutical Supply Chain”
  • Richard Huskey, Communication: “Using Brains to Change Minds”
  • Rachel Levinson-Emley, English: “Bleeding to Heal: Wounds and Intersubjectivity from Medieval Romance to Today”
  • Heather Simpson, Linguistics: “Remember These 3 to 5 Things: How the Rhythm and Pitch of the Voice Defines the Limits of Short-Term Memory”
  • Mary Toothman, Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology: “In the Water or in the Genes? What Makes an Infectious Disease Deadly (or Not)?”

ROUND 4 - Pacific View Room, Davidson Library (8th floor) - 3 to 4 p.m. 

  • Melissa Alcorn, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology: “Big Data, Tiny Worm: Building a Practical Model for Personalized Medicine” 
  • Taylor Damiani, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology: “Grit: The Hidden Quality That Makes Winners Succeed”
  • Patrick Hall, Linguistics: “A California Language You Should Know About”
  • Tanika Ladd, Marine Science: “The Ocean's Chalk Factory - How Microscopic Plants Control the Earth's Carbon Cycle”
  • Caleb Miller, Political Science: “How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Post-Democracy”
  • Jessica Perkins, Bren School of Environmental Science and Management: “Life Cycle Assessment & Decision Making - Finding a Solution, Not Just Changing the Problem”
  • Celeste Pilegard, Psychological and Brain Sciences: “What Can We Learn From Video Games?”
  • Ken Sterling, Education: “Imagine a Reality TV Show with a Boss Handing a Scan-Tron Form to an Employee”
  • Cameron Sublett, Education: “Does Community College Online Course Enrollment Impair Student Success?”

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8:

ROUND 5 - Multipurpose Room, Student Resource Building - 11 a.m. to noon

  • Andrea Adams, Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology: “Solving the Mystery of Southern California’s Vanishing Frogs: Looking to the Past for Evidence of Disease” 
  • David Copp, Mechanical Engineering: “Closing the Loop: Engineering an Artificial Pancreas”
  • Matthew Gebbie, Materials: “Simplifying Nature's Invention: Engineering Mussel Proteins into Biomedical Glues”
  • Abel Gustafson, Communication: “Predicting Election Outcomes Using Wikipedia”
  • Andrew Johnson, Political Science: “Hegel’s Polizei: Between Security and Welfare”
  • Lily Li, Mechanical Engineering: Enhance Mass Sensing Using Nonlinearity” 
  • Faye Walker, Chemistry and Biochemistry: “The Uberification of Genetic Testing”
  • Dibella Wdzenczny, Linguistics: “I Can Chat Ya in Kamchatka”

ROUND 6 - IHC McCune Conference Room - 4 to 5 p.m. 

  • Mario Galicia, Education: “'Pushed Out’ and ‘Pulled In’: Institutional Bridging for Marginalized Students”
  • Ana Elisa Garcia-Vedrenne, Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology: “Snail Parasites and Warrior Worms” 
  • Haddy Kreie, Theater and Dance: “Is Blackness Trauma?: Racial Discourse, Trauma Theory, and Vodun Aesthetics”
  • Joshua Kuntzman, Education: “Do You See Why I Love This Subject?: Educational Dialog and the Importance of Real Human Teachers”
  • Sabrina Liu, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology: “The Power of Hope: First Year Students' Adjustment to College Amidst Tragedy”
  • Lakshmanan Nataraj, Electrical and Computer Engineering: “Photographing Computer Programs to Identify Malicious Software”
  • Lauren Smyth, Anthropology: “Aspiring towards Greatness: (Re)Presenting Muslim Identity in the American Urban Environment”
  • Erik Spickard, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology: “Gonads to Guts: Reprogramming an Organ in the Nematode C. elegans”

THURSDAY, APRIL 9:

ROUND 7 - 1605 Elings Hall- 11 a.m. to noon

  • Anish Bhattacharjya, Chemistry and Biochemistry: “Generating and Using Aryl Grignard Reagents in Water, ONLY Water”
  • Oree Holban, Art: “The Big MM: Transgender Sensations, Transportation, and the Poetry of Limbo”
  • Brian Hoskins, Materials: “Synaptic Engineering”
  • Ian McCullough, Bren School of Environmental Science and Management: “A Last Stand? Will California's Ponderosa Pine Forests Survive Climate Change?”
  • Kamala Qalandar, Mechanical Engineering: “Small But Mighty: Energy Efficiency in Micromechanical Systems”  
  • Zuleyma Rogel, Education: “Latino Parents' Negotiation and Development of Letters to Their School Board on a Funding Priority”
  • Ashley Sanford, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology: “The Science of Meaning-Making”
  • Emily Wilson, Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology: “Detecting Invasive Species Using Environmental DNA”

ROUND 8 - Santa Cruz Residence Hall Main Lounge - 3 to 4 p.m.

  • Ty Brandt, Bren School of Environmental Science and Management: “Why Study Snow from the Beach?”
  • Selvi Ersoy, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology: “Killing Me Softly with Antibiotics”  
  • S.C. Kaplan, French and Italian: “’Apprendre et Endoctriner’: Women Teaching Women in 15th-Century France
  • Adam Klein, Psychological and Brain Sciences: “Illuminating the Circuitry of Addiction”
  • Sungmin Moon, Education: “Pizza, Pisa, PISA”
  • Desmond Ramirez, Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology: “’Seeing’ Octopus Skin in the Light of Evolution” 
  • Wencheng Yan, History of Art and Architecture: “Writing Modernity: Constructing a History of Chinese Architecture, 1920 – 1949”

Semifinals Round Schedule:

MONDAY, APRIL 13:

ROUND 1 - Multipurpose Room, Student Resource Building - 11 a.m. to noon

  • Sarah Abdul-Wajid, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology: “Using Sea Squirts to Find New Genetic Factors Controlling Birth Defects”
  • David Copp, Mechanical Engineering: “Closing the Loop: Engineering an Artificial Pancreas”
  • Brian Hoskins, Materials: “Synaptic Engineering”
  • Joshua Kuntzman, Education: “Do You See Why I Love This Subject?': Educational Dialog and the Importance of Real Human Teachers”
  • Jessica Perkins, Bren School of Environmental Science and Management: “Life Cycle Assessment: There's more to the Story”
  • Laura Reynolds, Earth Science: “Memories in Mud: How Marshes Tell Us about Past, Present, and Future Sea-Level Change”
  • Wencheng Yan, History of Art and Architecture: “Writing Modernity: Constructing a History of Chinese Architecture, 1920-1949”

TUESDAY, APRIL 14:

ROUND 2 - People's Choice Winners - Multipurpose Room, Student Resource Building - 4 to 5 p.m.

  • Ty Brandt, Bren School of Environmental Science and Management: “Why Study Snow from the Beach?”
  • Aileen Fullchange, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology: “The HEROES Project”
  • Abel Gustafson, Communication: “Predicting Election Outcomes Using Wikipedia”
  • Umihiko Hoshijima, Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology: “Kelp Forests on Acid: Local Climate Change Mitigation in a Changing Ocean”
  • Richard Huskey, Communication: “Using Brains to Change Minds”
  • Sabrina Liu, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology: “The Power of Hope: First Year Students' Adjustment to College Amidst Tragedy”
  • Ian McCullough, Bren School of Environmental Science and Management: “A Last Stand? Will California's Ponderosa Pine Forests Survive Climate Change?”
  • Lakshmanan Nataraj, Electrical and Computer Engineering: “Photographing Computer Programs to Identify Malicious Software”
  • Ken Sterling, Education: “Imagine a Reality TV Show with a Boss Handing a Scan-Tron Form to an Employee”

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15:

ROUND 3 Engineering Science Building 1001 - 11 a.m. to noon

  • Jamie Booth, Mechanical Engineering: “Gecko-Inspired Adhesive Materials”
  • Selvi Ersoy, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology: “Killing Me Softly with Antibiotics”
  • Matthew Gebbie, Materials: “Simplifying Nature's Invention: Engineering Mussel Proteins into Biomedical Glues"
  • Daniel Hieber, Linguistics: “Renaissance on the Bayou: Reviving the Chitimacha Language”
  • Celeste Pilegard, Psychological and Brain Sciences: “What Can We Learn From Video Games?”
  • Ashley Sanford, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology: “The Science of Meaning-Making”
  • Erik Spickard, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology: “Gonads to Guts: Reprogramming an Organ in the Nematode C. elegans”
  • Mary Toothman, Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology: “In the Water or in the Genes? What Makes an Infectious Disease Deadly (or Not)? 

 

Finals Round - Friday, April 17, Corwin Pavilion, 3 to 4 p.m.

  • Sarah Abdul-Wajid, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology: “Using Sea Squirts to Find New Genetic Factors Controlling Birth Defects”
  • Yan Wencheng, History of Art and Architecture: “Writing Modernity: Constructing a History of Chinese Architecture, 1920-1949”
  • David Copp, Mechanical Engineering: “Closing the Loop: Engineering an Artificial Pancreas”
  • Daniel Hieber, Linguistics: “Renaissance on the Bayou: Reviving the Chitimacha Language”
  • Selvi Ersoy, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology: “Killing Me Softly with Antibiotics”
  • Lakshmanan Nataraj, Electrical and Computer Engineering: “Photographing Computer Programs to Identify Malicious Software”
  • Matthew Gebbie, Materials: “Simplifying Nature's Invention: Engineering Mussel Proteins into Biomedical Glues"
  • Jessica Perkins, Bren School of Environmental Science and Management: “Life Cycle Assessment: There's more to the Story”
  • Erik Spickard, Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology: “Gonads to Guts: Reprogramming an Organ in the Nematode C. elegans”
  • Abel Gustafson, Communication: “Predicting Election Outcomes Using Wikipedia”

 

 

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