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Graduate Peers' Schedules

Winter 2016
Peer Advisor Availability

Writing Peer
Kyle Crocco

Mon: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Tue: 10 a.m.-noon
Wed: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Thu: 10 a.m.-noon

Funding Peer
Stephanie Griffin
Mon: 10 a.m.-noon
Wed: noon-2 p.m.

Diversity Peer
Ana Romero

Mon: noon-2 p.m.
Wed: 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

The peers sometimes hold events or attend meetings during their regular office hours. To assure you connect with your Graduate Peer Advisor, we encourage you to contact them by email and make an appointment.

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Entries in study abroad (15)

Monday
Feb222016

Ph.D. Course and Funding at Freie Universität Berlin

Ph.D. students are invited to take advantage of an opportunity to study at Freie Universität Berlin for 3-6 months starting in October. An application to study abroad for a semester is available through Erasmus+, along with free tuition. Applications for 5 available exchange spots are due May 31. These spots also come with monthly living stipends (€800/month) and local travel allowances (€1100). Freie Universität Berlin

Application Deadline: May 31

Visa Requirements: Entry visa requirements vary by citizenship; all international students must apply for residence permits.

Program Dates: Starting in October, continuing 3-6 months

Mandatory Expenses: All students must have comprehensive health insurance valid in Germany and pay non-university “social fees” of €250/semester (which provides a ticket for public transportation throughout Berlin for the semester).

Allowances: Monthly stipend (€800/month) and local travel allowance (€1100)

Apply with their application form. All required materials and more details are available on their website.

Friday
Feb272015

Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad

Fulbright-Hays studentThe Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad program will fund doctoral students to conduct research in other countries, in modern foreign languages and area studies, for periods of six to twelve months.

Research must focus on one or more of the following geographic areas: Africa, East Asia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands, South Asia, the Near East, Central and Eastern Europe and Eurasia, and the Western Hemisphere (excluding the United States and its territories).

Competitive preference is given to applicants who focus on any of the 78 languages selected from the U.S. Department of Education’s list of Less Commonly Taught Languages (LCTLs) and are doing research related to economics, engineering, international development, global education, mathematics, political science, public health, science, or technology.

Fellowships range from $15,000 to $60,000.

(Note: This is separate from the Fulbright U.S. Student Program)

Interested students must contact Robert Hamm in the Graduate Division at robert.hamm@graddiv.ucsb.edu or 805-893-2671 to discuss the application. Completed online applications are due Tuesday, April 28 at 4 p.m.

Eligibility

  • Is a citizen or national of the United States or is a permanent resident of the United States;
  • Is a graduate student in good standing at an institution of higher education in the United States who, when the fellowship begins, is admitted to candidacy in a doctoral program in modern foreign languages and area studies at that institution;
  • Is planning a teaching career in the United States upon graduation; and
  • Possesses adequate skills in the language(s) necessary to carry out the dissertation project.

 Expenses Covered by the Award

  • Travel expenses, including excess baggage to and from the residence of the fellow to the host country of research;
  • Maintenance and dependents allowances based on the cost of living in country(ies) of research for the fellow and his or her dependent(s);
  • Project allowance for research related expenses such as books, copying, tuition and affiliation fees, local travel and other incidental expenses;
  • Health and accident insurance premiums; and
  • $100 administrative fee to applicant institution.

The pre-application webinar for the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad is scheduled for Wednesday, March 11, from 1 to 3 p.m. (Eastern Standard Time).

Please register at:
https://educate.webex.com/educate/j.php?RGID=r01405f662040664f0aa74e91f52bbb4b

Once the host approves your request, you will receive a confirmation e-mail with instructions for joining the meeting.

To view in other time zones or languages, please click the link:
https://educate.webex.com/educate/j.php?RGID=r254e7faf2c61491c67bd7570459f85f9

For audio, you must call in to the conference call line below. (PLEASE NOTE: Audio will not be provided if you just log onto the webinar using the information above.)

  1. Dial the Access Telephone Number: 877-917-4910
  2. When prompted, dial the access code: 9036176

If you would like to submit questions in advance, please send your question to DDRA@ed.gov or Carla.White@ed.gov.

Wednesday
Dec102014

Interested in Languages and Government? Check Out the Boren Fellowship

Boren Logo

A representative from the Boren Fellowship came to campus on Monday, December 8. If you are interested in government service and learning a language in a country important for national security, this fellowship could be for you.

Here is a recap of important information for graduate students interested in applying.

Commitment to Public Service: All Boren Fellows are required to do at least one year of government service upon completion of their fellowship and within two years of their graduation. If you have a longer fellowship, you will be required to do a longer fellowship (up to two years). Boren Fellows are given a hiring preference for the U.S. government, so if you are interested in public service, this fellowship is a great stepping stone for your career.

Eligibility: You must be a U.S. citizen in a Ph.D. program, interested in studying a foreign language, who will not graduate before the end of the Boren Fellowship.

Disciplines: A preference for STEM, law, foreign languages, public policy, business, and social sciences. For a complete list, click here.

Deadline: The application deadline for the 2015-16 academic year is Tuesday, Jan. 27.

Awards: Awards are based on the time you plan to spend abroad. The maximum award is $30,000 for 24 months. You can use this award in conjunction with other fellowships, such as the Fulbright.

Countries: Areas of the world that are critical to U.S. interests, including Africa, Asia, Central & Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin America, and the Middle East. The countries of Western Europe, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand are excluded. For a complete list of countries, click here. Note: Some countries are excluded for safety reasons.

Languages: Less commonly taught languages, including but not limited to Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian and Swahili. For a complete list of languages, click here. Note: For French and Spanish, you must have an advanced level to be funded for your research project.

Application Emphasis:

Reviewers put the most weight on these five areas:

Country choice: Previous experience or knowledge of the region is helpful.

Language choice: You are not required to know or have any knowledge of a language beforehand. However, choosing a critical language for national security is helpful.

Field of study: This is the least weighted of the five categories since most fields are applicable.

Length of study: This is the second most important category. There is a preference for a commitment at least six to twelve months abroad. The longer the better.

Commitment to government service: This is the most important of the five criteria. Explain very clearly why you are committed to serve the government, where you want to work in the government, what department you want to work in, what work you want to do in this department, and what groups you want to serve. (Note: Military service is included as commitment). The four priority departments for service are Defense, State, Homeland Security, and Intelligence. Additional departments include NASA, International Trade Association, Peace Corps, EPA, and DOE.

Application Parts:

  • Transcripts
  • 3 letters of recommendation: Ask professors as early as possible. One should be from an advisor or mentor in your research.
  • Budget: This is just an estimate. A more detailed budget will be worked out once you are accepted.
  • Language proficiency form: Optional. But for French and Spanish, an advanced proficiency is required.
  • Letter of overseas affiliation: If you have an affiliation with a research institution, you must have a letter. However, it is not required at time of the application.
  • 3 essays

Application Essays:

National security/future career: This is where you provide your own definition of national security and how you will apply your skills in your country of choice. National security can be traditional, such as protecting U.S. interests, or could be something like water security, food security, women’s rights, or environmental concerns.

Study plan: This is where you detail the internship you would like to do in the country you would like to do it in, such as research, classroom study, etc.

Language goals: The proficiency level you would like to attain and how you will attain it.

 

Thursday
May292014

Academic Exchange Opportunities with Fulbright Canada 

Fulbright Canada is now offering a wide range of awards for academic exchange to Canada. Academic exchanges expose students to new ideas and new perspectives, encourage networking, and highlight a different culture.

Core Facts

  • Fulbright Canada competition is now open, and closes on October 14, 2014. (Nov 15 for STEM).
  • The competition is for awards taken up for a 9-month academic year starting September 2015.

Eligibility

  • Must be an American citizen.
  • Must have earned a bachelor's degree prior to the proposed start date of the grant.

Graduate Students can apply for these awards:

  • Traditional Fulbright student awards: US $15,000 for one nine-month academic year. These all-discipline awards can be utilized at any college, university, think tank, or government agency in Canada.
  • Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Awards: Valued at US $120,000 for three academic years, this award is for students in STEM fields who wish to study at one of six top-ranked partner research institutions in Canada.

Inquiries:

Background

The mandate of Fulbright Canada is to enhance mutual understanding between the people of Canada and the people of the United States of America by providing support to outstanding individuals. These individuals conduct research, lecture, or enroll in formal academic programs in the other country. In doing so, Fulbright Canada aims to grow intellectual capacity, increase productivity, and assist in the shaping of future leaders.

For more details about all of our awards, please visit http://www.fulbright.ca/programs/apply-now/

Fulbright Canada

Monday
May062013

Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Award

The Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad program will fund doctoral students to conduct research in other countries, in modern foreign languages and area studies, for periods of six to twelve months. Research must focus on one or more of the following geographic areas: Africa, East Asia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands, South Asia, the Near East, Central and Eastern Europe and Eurasia, and the Western Hemisphere (excluding the United States and its territories). Competitive preference is given to applicants who focus on any of the 78 languages selected from the U.S. Department of Education’s list of Less Commonly Taught Languages (LCTLs) and are doing research related to economics, engineering, international development, global education, mathematics, political science, public health, science, or technology. Fellowships range from $15,000 to $60,000. (Note: This is separate from the Fulbright U.S. Student Program)

Interested students must contact Rosy Hanssen in the Graduate Division at rosemarie.hanssen@graddiv.ucsb.edu or 805-893-5247 to discuss the application. Completed online applications are due Tuesday, May 21 at 4 p.m.

Eligibility

  • Is a citizen or national of the United States or is a permanent resident of the United States;
  • Is a graduate student in good standing at an institution of higher education in the United States who, when the fellowship begins, is admitted to candidacy in a doctoral program in modern foreign languages and area studies at that institution;
  • Is planning a teaching career in the United States upon graduation; and
  • Possesses adequate skills in the language(s) necessary to carry out the dissertation project.

 Expenses Covered by the Award

  • Travel expenses, including excess baggage to and from the residence of the fellow to the host country of research;
  • Maintenance and dependents allowances based on the cost of living in country(ies) of research for the fellow and his or her dependent(s);
  • Project allowance for research related expenses such as books, copying, tuition and affiliation fees, local travel and other incidental expenses;
  • Health and accident insurance premiums; and
  • $100 administrative fee to applicant institution.
Thursday
May242012

Fulbright Workshop Recap

On Monday, we had a Fulbright session full of great information for students considering doing research abroad with the Fulbright program. Francisco Herrera, extramural funding advisor from Graduate Division, gave an overview of the Fulbright application process and shared this flyer which covers the basics of the Fulbright application (application components, deadlines, website, tips, etc.).

Courtney Gosnell, funding peer advisor, reminded students of the fellowship proposal library in the Graduate Student Resource Center and encouraged them to stop by to view successful Fulbright applications from previous years. These can be a great resource as you try to get an idea of what Fulbright is really looking for.

Finally, Dr. John Hajda (who has been involved with Fulbright and the faculty review committee here at UCSB for years) shared some great tips for writing successful Fulbright applications. Below we summarize some of the interesting information and advice he shared with students:

  • Faculty Interviews: On-campus interviews for Fulbright typically involve three faculty members (usually not from your department) and last approximately 20 minutes. They will ask you to give a brief summary of your project (30 seconds to 1 minute) where you cover the "what, where, and why" and will then ask various questions. Some of these will focus on your project and what you plan to do while others may focus on your country of interest or other topics. They often make a point to ask challenging questions to see how you respond in difficult circumstances.
  • Campus Committee Evaluations: The UCSB faculty committee will fill out an evaluation on you that speaks to your academic/professional qualifications, believability/feasibility of your project plan, language qualifications, maturity/motivation/adaptability, as well as the type of impression you would make as an ambassador of the U.S. They will give you a rating from 1 to 4 (1=exceptional, 4=do not recommend). You won't ever know what rating you received, but Dr. Hajda encouraged students not to stress too much about this (as most students who go through the process and put effort into their proposals will NOT receive 4s and the ratings only carry so much weight (since every university varies in how easily they give out high ratings)).
  • Country of Interest: Knowledge of the host country you plan to go to is important in both your interview and application. Many applicants are up to date on current events in the country and have a true interest in and passion for that country. In your application, it also helps if you are hoping to establish life-long partnerships with the country (going back to conduct research there on a regular basis or establishing collaborators there).
  • Framing your Writing: Keep in mind that many different individuals will be reading and reviewing your proposal so avoid discipline-specific jargon if possible and make sure your proposal is interesting and understandable to someone not in your field. Your application will be reviewed by a faculty committee at UCSB (most likely not from your department), a Fulbright committee that specializes in your country of interest (faculty from a variety of disciplines), as well as a screening committee in the host country (the make-up of this panel will vary but will likely include non-faculty members from the U.S. Embassy and others nominated by the host country (perhaps members of their Department of Education)).
  • Personal Statement: Make sure your personal statement doesn't just speak to you as an individual, but also talks about the country and why you are passionate about that country in particular.
  • Statement of Grant Purpose: Give your proposal a clear descriptive title (don't use the format of "vague phrase: what the proposal really is about"). Consider starting your proposal with a narrative or story or you can hit the reader with your primary research question up front (you'll notice different styles of opening if you read through some of the sample proposals). Make sure to have a very clear, well-thought out research plan (including information about contacts or collaborations you've made that will help you to execute the project).
  • Ready to Apply? Check out the Fulbright application page for a lot of great information and to begin the application.
  • Have Questions? Some of the Fulbright information, rules, benefits, etc. vary by country. Each region (representing several countries) has a program manager who is a great contact for specific questions about your country and the application process. If you have general questions about Fulbright or the application process at UCSB, you can contact Francisco Herrera at francisco.herrera@graddiv.ucsb.edu. If you would like to set up an appointment to view successful fellowship proposals or to learn more about finding other funding opportunities outside of Fulbright, you can contact funding peer advisor Courtney Gosnell at fundingpeer@graddiv.ucsb.edu.
Tuesday
May222012

Study Abroad Fellowship Workshop Recap

Graduate Division recently hosted a Study Abroad Fellowships workshop highlighting a variety of funding opportunities for graduate students to do research or engage in foreign cultures abroad. Francisco Herrera, a Graduate Division extramural funding advisor, provided basic overviews of many of the major sources of study abroad fellowship opportunities while Courtney Gosnell, funding peer advisor, pointed students to resources they could use to search for other sources of funding for travel and research abroad. If you missed the workshop, you can download the powerpoint slides or view the presentation below to get caught up to speed or can set up an appointment with Francisco (francisco.herrera@graddiv.ucsb.edu) or Courtney (fundingpeer@graddiv.ucsb.edu).

Tuesday
May012012

Study Abroad Fellowship Workshop

If you need to go abroad to conduct your research (or simply have the travel bug and are hoping to find a reason to study in another country), check out our Study Abroad Fellowship Workshop on Monday, May 7, at 4:45 p.m. in the Multipurpose Room of the Student Resource Building. We'll be covering some of the major study abroad opportunities for graduate students (Fulbright, Boren, NSF Summer Program, Whitaker, Critical Language Scholarships) and will also talk about how you can search for other international funding opportunities. If you're interested in attending, please RSVP to Courtney Gosnell at fundingpeer@graddiv.ucsb.edu with your name, department, and year.

Tuesday
Nov152011

Boren Fellowships May Help You Study Abroad!

Boren Fellowships provide opportunities for U.S. graduate students to add an international and language component to their studies by going abroad to countries that are critical to U.S. interests! Check out the details below or visit their website.

 

Boren Fellowships provide up to $30,000 to U.S. graduate students to add an important international and language component to their graduate education through specialization in area study, language study, or increased language proficiency. Boren Fellowships support study and research in areas of the world that are critical to U.S. interests, including Africa, Asia, Central & Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin America, and the Middle East. The countries of Western Europe, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand are excluded.  For a complete list of countries, click here.

Boren Fellows represent a variety of academic and professional disciplines, but all are interested in studying less commonly taught languages, including but not limited to Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian and Swahili. For a complete list of languages, click here.

Boren Fellowships are funded by the National Security Education Program (NSEP), which focuses on geographic areas, languages, and fields of study deemed critical to U.S. national security. Applicants should identify how their projects, as well as their future academic and career goals, will contribute to U.S. national security, broadly defined.  NSEP draws on a broad definition of national security, recognizing that the scope of national security has expanded to include not only the traditional concerns of protecting and promoting American well-being, but also the challenges of global society, including sustainable development, environmental degradation, global disease and hunger, population growth and migration, and economic competitiveness.

Tuesday
Nov152011

New Fulbright Public Policy Fellowship

Fulbright is offering an exciting new program that will allow students to be placed in positions in foreign government or institutions while they also conduct research! Check out the details below:

 

The Fulbright Public Policy Fellowship" will allow U.S. citizens to contribute to the strengthening of the public sector abroad by serving in professional placements within foreign government ministries or institutions while simultaneously carrying out an academic research/study project.   The fellowship will help advance public policy research agendas, fosters mutual understanding and builds lasting ties between the U.S. and partner countries. 

Selected Fulbright Students will work side-by-side with the citizens of other countries to tackle the toughest public policy problems of the day. This new exchange is the vanguard of international public diplomacy, as it leverages the excellence of the Fulbright program to achieve global development objectives.
Fulbright Public Policy Fellows will serve in partner country governments, which include:

·         Bangladesh
·         Cote d’Ivoire
·         The Dominican Republic
·         Guatemala
·         Haiti
·         Jamaica
·         Mongolia
·         Nepal
·         Nigeria
·         Thailand
·         Tunisia

The U.S. Department of State and partner country governments will coordinate professional placements for candidates in public policy areas including, but not limited to, public health, education, agriculture, justice, energy, environment, public finance, economic development, housing and communications.

Candidates must be in receipt of a master’s or J.D. degree by the beginning of the Fellowship (Summer 2012) or be currently enrolled in a Ph.D. program.  Applicants must apply At-Large and have at least two years of work experience in public policy-related fields.  Final selection will be made by the Presidentially-appointed J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board.

More information, including complete eligibility requirements, please contact Theresa Granza, tgranza@iie.org or Walter Jackson, wjackson@iie.org.  For more information on how to apply, please visit http://us.fulbrightonline.org/applynow.html.

Applications for the 2012-13 competition will be accepted from November 4, 2011 through February 1, 2012; Fulbright Public Policy Fellows will begin their assignments in summer/fall 2012.