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Graduate Peers' Schedules

Winter 2016
Peer Advisor Availability

Writing Peer
Kyle Crocco

Mon: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Tue: 10 a.m.-noon
Wed: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Thu: 10 a.m.-noon

Funding Peer
Stephanie Griffin
Mon: 10 a.m.-noon
Wed: noon-2 p.m.

Diversity Peer
Ana Romero

Mon: noon-2 p.m.
Wed: 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

The peers sometimes hold events or attend meetings during their regular office hours. To assure you connect with your Graduate Peer Advisor, we encourage you to contact them by email and make an appointment.

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Friday
Feb262016

Recap of Resume Workshop

For most graduate students, their resumes are dusty, outdated documents that are lost somewhere in the files. If you are like most graduate students, then you could benefit from learning a few tips on how to create a great resume!

Here is a brief recap of how to make a great graduate student resume:

  • You can use your CV as a reference, but consider this as a totally new document with a new purpose: to briefly showcase your relevant skills
  • Research is the basis for a great, well-crafted resume
  • You need to target each and every resume for the job you apply for - this means you will have to edit and change the order of various sections and the text of bullets to be geared towards various positions to better align with the job you are after
  • Resumes should be one page! (Two pages is sometimes acceptable)
  • You generally need a cover letter in addition to a resume when applying to industry jobs
  • Font size needs to be 11 or 12
  • Typical sections include education, relevant experience, and skills - utilizing clear titles for sections will be important to organizing your experiences
  • You need 3-5 bullet points per place of work where you elaborate beyond duties and discuss what you did, how you did it, and outcomes/results of your work (hint: include transferable skills!)

Check out UCSB’s Career Services resume tips for more information and please consider coming in to meet with me to review your resume!

Thursday
Feb252016

Recap of Transferable Skills Workshop

Credit: inspiringinterns.comTransferable skills is a buzzword in nowadays – perhaps you’ve heard the term and wondered, "What does that really mean?"

In case you missed it, on February 3, I presented a workshop on how to identify the transferable skills you are getting from your graduate program. Transferable skills can be defined as a way to talk about your academic skills more broadly. By being able to recognize your transferable skills, you are able to talk to people outside academia and those unfamiliar with working with Ph.D./Masters students about the skills that are relevant to what they do.

In grad school, you learn to become a highly trained researcher who can understand nuanced and specialized information. This is what you are working hard to achieve, and this is to be celebrated. But it certainly isn’t the full range of skills you are learning. So what else are you getting from your graduate program? You are learning skills that go beyond technical skills and fall into other categories such as how to work on a team, how to develop and manage a project, and how to communicate difficult concepts.

The art of this is thinking about your tasks and turning them into skills. I encourage you to spend time thinking of what your transferable skills are, beyond the specific duties or tasks assigned by your advisor.

The other point I wanted to make is that graduate students often have to become their own advocates in order to show how the knowledge you have is relevant and applicable to various employers. To do that, you need to learn how to talk your skills beyond your highly specified knowledge. By being able to show what your diverse skill set is, you are opening the door to many possibilities.

Stay tuned for this popular workshop to be held again in the near future!

Thursday
Feb252016

ACLS Seeks Humanities Ph.D. Applicants for Public Fellows Program

Calling all soon-to-graduate Ph.D. students in the humanities! The ACLS Public Fellows program is expanding this year and is offering 21 recent humanities Ph.D.s a two-year appointment in a variety of positions. This is a great opportunity for students seeking positions within and outside of academia.

Applications are due March 24.

Further details:

  • Competitive applicants will have been successful in both academic and extra-academic experiences and will aspire to careers in administration, management, and public services by choice rather than circumstance.
  • Applicants must possess US citizenship or permanent resident status
  • Applicants must have received a Ph.D. in Humanities or Humanistic Social Sciences conferred between January 1, 2013 and June 12, 2016
  • Application information and complete position descriptions are available here
  • Fellows receive a stipend of $65,000 per year as well as individual health insurance and funds for professional development
Tuesday
Feb232016

STEM Ph.D. Internship Opportunities at Amgen

By now you've maybe started thinking about your summer plans. If you are a STEM Ph.D. student and are looking for a local internship, there may be a great opportunity for you at Amgen!

Check out UCSB's GauchoLink to get more details on how to apply for the following internship positions:

  • Grad Intern - R&D - (Biologics Optimization)
  • Grad Intern - R&D - (Biologics Optimization)
  • Grad Intern - R&D - (Risk Communication)
  • Grad Intern - R&D - (Global Scientific Communications)

Best of luck with the process! For anyone who may want help with job application materials (e.g., resume, cover letter), make an appointment or drop in to see me!

Tuesday
Feb232016

Mellon Foundation Seeks Ph.D. for Program Officer Position

Here is a great job ad that came across my desk and I thought it could be a great fit for a UCSB graduate student who is looking for a non-academic job.

Job Details:

THE ANDREW W. MELLON FOUNDATION

PROGRAM OFFICER

NEW YORK, NY

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation (“Foundation”) is a not-for-profit, grant-making organization that seeks to strengthen, promote, and, where necessary, defend the contributions of the humanities and the arts to human flourishing and to the well-being of diverse and democratic societies. It makes grants in five core program areas (higher education and scholarship in the humanities; arts and cultural heritage; diversity; scholarly communications; and international higher education and strategic projects). The Foundation seeks a Program Officer capable of assuming a wide range of responsibilities in the Scholarly Communications department.

Position Details:

The Program Officer in Scholarly Communications reports to and takes direction from the Senior Program Officer and cultivates, mentors, and supervises program staff. The Program Officer meets regularly with leaders in the field, invites and evaluates proposals, prepares grant recommendations, manages budgets, and participates in policy discussions. The Program Officer also contributes actively to various collective activities and special initiatives of the Foundation, and helps maintain an effective and collegial work environment.

Responsibilities:

  • Assists the Senior Program Officer in managing and monitoring Scholarly Communications program activity and its grant portfolio;
  • Manages and monitors grant-making budgets;
  • Interacts with scholars and leaders in higher education, libraries, archives, publishing, and information technology to stay abreast of developments in scholarly communication practices, especially as they affect and guide programmatic objectives;
  • Engages collaboratively with other staff in advancing aspects of the Foundation’s mission, including areas of joint interest such as the enhancement of diversity in and international collaborations among organizations devoted to scholarly communications;
  • Invites, evaluates, and offers guidance on the development of proposals;
  • Develops, facilitates, and monitors Scholarly Communications program initiatives across institutions
  • Prepares grant recommendations, essays and reports for the Foundation’s officers and board of trustees;
  • Attends Board meetings and presents grant recommendations;
  • Oversees staff responsible for post-award grant management and participates in the monitoring and reconciliation of grant narrative and financial reports;
  • Tracks and assesses the progress of Scholarly Communications-supported programs;
  • Represents the Foundation in meetings with current and prospective grantee organizations, Foundation partners, and professional organizations; and
  • Performs additional duties as called upon.

Required Skills and Experience:

  • An advanced academic degree (Ph.D or equivalent);
  • Personal initiative and a mature commitment to liberal education;
  • Several years of teaching and research experience in higher education, and familiarity with scholarly communications, its history and current concerns;
  • Outstanding interpersonal communication, team building, mentoring, and leadership skills;
  • Demonstrated competence in public speaking and written communication;
  • Advanced computer and office skills, including comfort using grant management systems and familiarity with social media, blogging, and web-based resources;
  • Experience in managing large and complex programs, facility with data collection and analysis, working knowledge of and interest in applied research;
  • Willingness to travel domestically and internationally; and
  • Commitment to a collegial work environment and to collaboration with colleagues in all of the Foundation’s program areas.

The Foundation is an equal opportunity employer, offering competitive salary, outstanding benefits, and excellent working conditions.

Qualified candidates should submit a resume and cover letter to: ProgramOfficerSC@mellon.org. They will consider each response carefully, but only contact those individuals they feel are most qualified for the position.

Monday
Feb222016

Careers Beyond Academia: A Conversation with Recent Musicology Ph.D.s

Are you a Humanities grad student wondering about careers outside the academy? Then consider attending an event hosted by the UCSB Department of Music on pursuing alternatives to academic careers after getting a Ph.D. The event is this Friday, February 26, from 3:30-5 p.m., and will feature three recent musicology Ph.D.s in a conversation about how they transformed their graduate school experiences into opportunities outside the academic job market. While the primary audience will be students in musicology and ethnomusicology, the issues discussed will certainly resonate with grad students from other humanities disciplines. See the flyer below for more information.

Wednesday
Feb172016

Versatile Ph.D. STEM Online Panel Discussion: 'Careers in Software Development'

Versatile Ph.D. will host a free web-based asynchronous panel discussion on "Careers in Software Development" from February 22-26. All panelists are Ph.D.s from STEM fields, including:

  • An Applied Mathematics Ph.D. who has worked in software development for many years as a developer and Team Lead, and is now Technical Project Manager at a legal software company
  • A Biophysics Ph.D. who is a Scientific Software Developer at a mathematical computing software company
  • A Genetics Ph.D. who does Business Development, Sales Engineering, and Technical Account Management at an enterprise software company while also adjuncting on the side
  • An Applied Mathematics Ph.D. who adjuncted briefly before becoming a Software Developer at General Motors

You can interact with panelists throughout the week on the site, or follow the discussion via email. All questions welcome, from the most general to the very specific. As a UCSB graduate student, you have free access to the information and resources on the Versatile Ph.D. website. To learn more about accessing its premium content, such as the panel discussions, follow these simple instructions provided by the Graduate Division.

Wednesday
Feb102016

STEM Outreach Program in México: Call for Instructors 

Clubes de Ciencia México is looking for instructors to teach Clubes de Ciencia (Science Clubs) in México this summer. They are looking for graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) fields. 

The Clubes de Ciencia México will take place in six cities: Ensenada, Guanajuato, Monterrey, Xalapa, Oaxaca, and Merida. Each Club is a week long with two dates to choose from: Week 1 (July 23-31) and Week 2 (July 30-August 7).

Not fluent in Spanish? No problem. Clubes can be taught in English and language barriers can be tackled with the help of their local instructors. 

Application Deadline: February 15, 2016 

For more information: http://www.clubesdeciencia.mx

Check out what previous instructors say about the program: 

 

Friday
Feb052016

Call for 2016 Spatial Lightning Talk Presentations

Do you have an idea for a spatially-oriented topic you can summarize in just 3 minutes? Spatial@UCSB is looking for intrepid presenters – students, faculty, staff, and friends – to give inspirational, educational, or just plain entertaining talks related to geography or space (i.e., just about anything). These talks are limited to 3 minutes per presenter, so it’s crucial to be efficient in your delivery and use more visuals than text. This is also a great chance to practice your Grad Slam-style presentation skills! For inspiration, watch videos of past years' talks. Participants from all departments and disciplines are welcome.

To present in the 2016 Spatial Lightning Talks, contact Crystal Bae by February 15 (preferably sooner).

What: 5th Annual Lightning Talks presented by spatial@ucsb
When: Monday, February 29 (lunch provided starting at 11:45 a.m., presentations begin at noon)
Where: Student Resource Building, Multipurpose Room
More Information: View the call for presentations

Wednesday
Feb032016

Think Like an Entrepreneur

As a graduate student, you may think of yourself as more of an apprentice than an entrepreneur. However, intellectual entrepreneurs (such as those engaged in academic research) are those who "take risks and seize opportunities, discover and create knowledge, innovate, collaborate, and solve problems in any number of social realms," according to Richard Cherwitz, a professor in the rhetoric department at the University of Texas at Austin.

In a recent article on Vitae, James Van Wyck encourages graduate students to apply to their career preparation the same entrepreneurial spirit they apply to their academic research. By thinking more like an entrepreneur (or a professional, CEO or revolutionary) and less like an apprentice, graduate students can better prepare themselves for a range of fulfilling and meaningful careers. Van Wyck gives some practical steps you can take:
  1. Begin by evaluating your relationship with your graduate adviser. Even if you have the best of advisers, she can’t help as much when it comes to alt-ac or compatible careers. Run your career search with the help of multiple advisers – an informal board of directors, if you will.
  2. Reject any discourse that figures your career using static metaphors. It’s not all or nothing. It’s not academe or bust. The idea of careers inside, outside, or even beyond higher education may not make sense when you’re in the middle of your career.
  3. Be aware of career choices made by osmosis. If you only hang with one group, you’re likely to absorb the norms of that group. So do a quick diagnosis: Whom do you associate with on a regular basis? Are they a diverse bunch with varying career goals?
  4. Learn to engage with people outside your field and the university setting. If you are going to strike out in new directions, you’ll need to get used to interacting with people who may never have thought of hiring or collaborating with a Ph.D. Familiarize yourself with organizations and people with whom you might like to work by regularly setting up informational interviews.
  5. Don’t only shift your attitude – act like an entrepreneur. Allow for more career possibilities by adjusting your habits, expanding your networks and diversifying what you make. Look up key characteristics of an entrepreneur and then cultivate a checklist of ideas that make sense for you and your discipline.
To read the full article, click here. To get regular updates from Vitae, sign up for their e-mail digest, or connect via Facebook or Twitter.